Ir al contenido principal

Entradas

El Poema del cuervo de Odin

Entradas recientes

1,000 year-old Viking sword found just lying on the ground in Iceland

The Cultural Agency of Iceland A large number of archaeological finds are often the work of accidental discoveries; wherein people and sometimes experts stumble upon an amazing historical artefact out of nowhere. In a similar case of accidental discovery, a group of goose hunters from Iceland got a lot more than what they bargained for while on a routine outing. more https://www.thevintagenews.com/2018/02/24/viking-sword/

THE WARRIOR ELITE

“The other order is that of the knights. These, when there is occasion and any war occurs …, are all engaged in war. And those of them most distinguished by birth and resources, have the greatest number of vassals and dependents about them”.

(Caesar. Gallic War. 6.15)






The warrior class was a crucial element in Celtic culture and, along with the druids, formed the backbone of the social structure in Iron Age European society. Their military aptitude and ability to mobilize significant numbers of troops is evident from accounts of their struggles with the classical world, and confirmed by the profusion of weapons found in their burials. The warrior class also played a central political role as participation in tribal councils was reserved for those who bore arms (Kruta V. 2004:190).

However, what has hitherto remained unclear is exactly what proportion of Celtic society this warrior class represented. An analysis of burials sites in southeastern Europe allows us to throw some li…

40,000-year-old bracelet made by extinct human species found

In what is quite an amazing discovery, scientists have confirmed that a bracelet found in Siberia is 40,000 years old. This makes it the oldest piece of jewelry ever discovered, and archeologists have been taken aback by the level of its sophistication.
The bracelet was discovered in a site called the Denisova Cave in Siberia, close to Russia’s border with China and Mongolia. It was found next to the bones of extinct animals, such as the wooly mammoth, and other artifacts dating back 125,000 years.
The cave is named after the Denisovan people — a mysterious species of hominins from the Homo genus, who are genetically different from both Homo sapiens and Neanderthals.

The Denisovan cave in Siberia Anatoly Derevyanko and Mikhail Shunkov, Vera Salnitskaya
We know that the Denisovans migrated out of Africa sometime after the first wave of Homo erectus, and well before us, Homo sapiens.
The Denisovans were unique in many ways, having branched away from other humanoid ancestor…

Why was a 9th century Viking woman buried with a ring that says ‘for Allah’ on it?

washingtonpost.com

In the modern-era, Scandinavian countries have become known for their sometimes awkward embrace of migrants from the Arab and Muslim world. But the history behind that relationship goes back far further than you might expect.
Consider the case of a ring discovered in a Viking grave in Birka, a historic trading center in what is now Sweden. The woman in the grave died in the 9th century and was discovered around a thousand years later by the famous Swedish archaeologist Hjalmar Stolpe, who spent years excavating the grave sites around Birka.
The ring is unique. Made of silver alloy, it contained a stone with an inscription written in the Kufic Arabic script widely used between the 8th and 10th centuries. "For/to Allah," the inscription read. It was the only known Viking Age ring with an Arabic inscription to be found in the entire of Scandinavia. Exactly how the woman got the ring wasn't clear – she was found wearing typical Scandinavian d…

Bronze Age burial near Stonehenge discovered by badger

http://www.bbc.com/news/uk-england-wiltshire-35523757?utm_content=buffer6f8d8&utm_medium=social&utm_source=facebook.com&utm_campaign=buffer


A Bronze Age cremation burial has been discovered near Stonehenge after being accidentally dug up by a badger. Objects found in a burial mound at Netheravon, Wiltshire, include a bronze saw, an archer's wrist guard, a copper chisel and cremated human remains.
Experts believe the burial may have been that of an archer or a person who made archery equipment.
The artefacts date back to 2,200-2,000BC, senior archaeologist Richard Osgood, of the MOD, said.
the burial mound, about five miles north of Stonehenge, lies on MOD land.
Mr Osgood, from the MOD's Defence Infrastructure Organisation, said it was "an exciting find".
"It was utterly unexpected. These are wonderful artefacts from the early Bronze Age, about 2,200-2,000 BC," he said